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JPG Pic of Franz,
            Justina, Maria Ens (1890?) [CLICK FOR LARGER]


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Family History Links:
Enns History
Fehr History
Guenther History Thiessen History

Family Tree Links:
Diagram (SVG) WebTrees (Online App) Gedcom
ToHTML (HTML Database)
Chart (Simple HTML)

Emmigration Ship Links:
SS Quebec (Enns/Unger/Hoeppner/Reimer) SS Sarmatian (Fehr/Wiens) SS Sardinian (Ginter) SS Canadian (Thiessen/Ham/Wolfe) SS Polynesian (Janzen/Penner) SS Peruvian (Ginter/Wiebe)
Deed/Map Links:
Land Grant Deeds Maps





ENNS NAME ORIGIN

The legend of the origin of the Enns family dates back hundreds of years ago, when an abandoned young boy was found beside the Enns River in Austria, and was named after that river. In other variations of this legend, two boys were found, but only one survived to reach adulthood. Also, that Dutch Mennonites found the boy(s) and brought them back to the Netherlands.

The actual origin of the name is not clear; it may have been derived from the Germanic name "Anshelm", "God's defender" (cf. Anselm, Arch- bishop of Canterbury, 1033-1109); possibly also a place name: Enns is a tributary of the Danube and the name of the oldest city in Austria.

According to Penner the name is most likely of East Frisian origin, where Enno and Enne are common as first names. In that case the name Enns in its various forms would be patronymic. Stumpp lists 50 Enns families that migrated from West Prussia to Russia. In Canada, Gerhard Ens (1864-1952) is regarded as the founder of the town of Rosthern, Sask. [Mennonite Names, Victor Peters/Jack Thiessen, 1987 M 929.4 page 53]

This Mennonite family name was originally found in the rural Flemish congregations of West Prussia. Members of this family migrated to Russia and North America. While in South Russia the family mostly adopted the spelling form Enns. Most Mennonites with this family name are now located in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Kansas, California and Arkansas. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online

The family ENTZ (Ens) probably comes from East Friesland. In East Friesland the name Enno or Enne is rather usual. Under the menonites of the early 17th century there is Enne Dyrks, Enne Ribs. In the East Frisian menonite community Neustadt-Gödens nearby Wilhelmshaven the name Enno appears more frequent as first name. According to the Frisian patronymic naming the name is also inflected as a surname used weakly, like the form "of the boy". The mennonites were called there not Ennes or Ens, but Ennen. In 1734 the menonite Jacob Ennen died in Neustadt-Gödens, another was called Albert Ennen, the third Gerrit Ennen. The municipality which experienced their biggest blossom in the 17th century, has surely delivered some emigrants to West Prussia. But also the strongly inflected form by the name of Enno appears in East Friesland like we will see below. The name has an strange effect if strong and weak flection are used together. So there is in the consignment of 1776 a shopkeeper and a menonite dressmaker in Marienburg which lead the name En-s-en. To the strong form Ens an "en" was suffixed. Perhaps they or their ancestors have immigrated from the provincial town Neustadt-Gödens to Marienburg. We found 1654 in Orloff the strongly inflected form Hans Ensz (Ens zoon). Around 1610 Jan Ents from Veenhuisen is named in East Friesland (near to the estuary of Ems). He was a representative of the so-called "Hard Frisians ". Further on also in West Prussia the name was written with "t". In 1709 Anke Entzen was buried in Orloff. In 1701 Jacob Entz on Tiegerweide is named. 16 "Entz" families which are known in 1727 between the Vistula and Nogat, all were written with "tz". In the consignment of 1776 all representatives of this family registered like this: Ens. [Die Ost-Und Westpreussischen Mennoniten In Ihrem, Horst Penner, 1978 page 260, translated into English (with much thanks) by Andreas Enns]

This link also establishes that the Enns name is of Flemish origin, and generally this group of people lived in the Delta area of Prussia before migrating to Russia.


ENNS AUSTRIA


JPG Pic of city of Enns crest

The most common theory for the origin of the Enns family involves the city of Enns, Austria (see legend above). This was the best (and only) theory until recently.

JPG enns crest by
                    dare

When I was in Junior High school, grade 7 or 8, around 1975, I tried to reproduce the Enns city crest in wood, and it is shown above.

Enns (ens) (KEY) , town (1991 pop. 8,111), Upper Austria prov., N central Austria, on the Enns River near its confluence with the Danube. Enns manufactures glassware, jewelry, and roofing. It is also home to several major breweries. One of Austria's oldest towns, it was established as a fortress in the 10th cent. and was chartered in 1212. The picturesque town retains part of its medieval walls, a 16th-century fortress, and a Gothic parish church (13th-15th cent.). The former town hall (16th cent.) now houses a museum that includes Roman relics. Lorch, incorporated into Enns in 1938, is on the site of a Roman camp established (c.A.D. 170) by Marcus Aurelius. Near Enns is the Augustinian monastery of St. Florian. Columbia Encyclopedia

PNG Pic of city of Enns

Here are some other sites (some in German) which talk about the city of Enns:


ENS NETHERLANDS


PNG Pic of village of Ens crest

The newest theory for the origin of the Enns family involves the ancient (now non-existant) village of Ens, Netherlands. This village was on the Island of Schokland until the island itself was abandoned in 1859, by order of King William III. This is a new theory that was suggested by the research of Gary Strahl.

There is a town called 'Ens' in Flevoland (but this is a new town only created in 1942). The 'Museum Schokland' kindly provided the following info:

  • The area was an island until the Zoy Der Zee was reclaimed.
  • The name 'Ens' originated over 1000 years ago from the word for 'Duck Lake', changing over the centuries. It was common for families to take the name of their town or village as their surname, and because of the Mennonite history/Low German langurage connection, it is very possible that the 'Enns' family originally comes from this area.
    • Year 793 = Anudseae (Anud = DUCK, Seae = LAKE)
    • Year 800/900 = Anudse
    • Year 1000 = Anusse
    • Year 1400 = Enusse
    • Year 1500 = Ennse
    • Year 1600 = Ens
Research Notes by Gary W. Strahl

This page confirms the research dates from Gary Strahl:

  • 793 = Enedseae
  • 1150 = Endesle
  • 1302 = Enesce (Jacobus van Enesce named from this place -- may have been the 1st 'Ens'!)
  • 1324 = Enze

Some information of Ens: The name comes from Ednessee -- eendenzee (sea for ducks). Ens was a part of the island Schokland. Before 1750 there was no name Schokland, only Ens and Emmeloord. Ens was Protestant (religion) and Emmeloord was Catholic. Ens had three places where the inhabitants could live. The Middelbuurt, Zuidert and the Zuidpunt. In total there were 350 people in Ens and 350 people in Emmeloord. Now we used the name Ens for a modern place in the Noordoostpolder. [thanks to William Vercraeye for providing this information!]

I used the InterTran translation engine to convert the words mentioned above:

  • Middelbuurt = Middle vicinity
  • Zuidert = South
  • Zuidpunt = South Tip InterTran (tm)
Here is another reference confirming the origin of Ens in the Netherlands: The name "Ens" was first mentioned in 793, as "Enedsae; in that year a mission was sent by the monastery of Werten in the Bishopric of Köln, to spread Christianity. [Flags of the World]

Outcome spent a ramble through the ethymologisch dictionary, called "Enedseae" showed in the description of the word 'duck'. The water bird who like the boat, instead of on the water goes. Enedseae sounded mystical, historical, cheerful and unknown. Enedseae means eendenzee, derived from the Germanic Anud-Saiwa (duck-sea), and is the earliest known name of the former island Ens. The later Schokland now dried located in the Northeast. A document of 793 makes it the first mention. A dating from 1150 registry calls it "Endesle". Finally, coming in 1302 "Enesce" and in 1324 "Enze" for. [Google translate of Maritime Identity]

Here are some old maps that show the village of Ens before it was submerged forever:

JPG Pic of map of Schokland (1733 by Jan
                      Christiaan Sepp) [CLICK FOR LARGER]

(Thanks to Bruno Klappe for this most-detailed map of Schokland produced in 1733 by Jan Christiaan Sepp)

Here are some other sites (some in Dutch) which talk about Ens and Schokland Island:

Pen drawing of the church on the south end of the island Schokland in Ens (located here):

JPG schokland church in Ens


One radical offshoot of the idea of the Enns family originating from the village of Ens is that it may also be the origin of the English non-Mennonite Ensign family!


FRANZ ENNS FAMILY STORY

According to the family bible account (shown below), Franz Enns traveled from Prussia to Russia in 1797 (when he was 1 year old) with his parents.  This would suggest that they were part of the following migration:

A group of 118 families immigrated from Germany in 1797. Because they did not have enough crown land, the government bought a parcel of land from Noble Miklaschevsky. In 1803 they first built Burwalde and Nieder-Chortitza on this parcel. In 1809 they founded Kronsthal and in 1812, Neu-Osterwick (today known as Osterwick). [Osterwick, Chortitza Colony, Russia Village Report - 1942]

In the years of 1793 - 1796 still more Mennonites arrived from Prussia. Altogether 118 families, of which most of them settled in the Chortizan colonies.  Because of lack of room, the rest were quartered in the town Alexandrowsk.  These new arrivals were called the second emigration.  Because of their own money and some German cattle stock they brought with them in addition to receiving support money,  the original community was livened. The community also happily received an advance of 1600 ruble  per family, to enhance their growth. That contributed to the erection of the first wooden prayer house.  In 1797, under supervision of Mr. Brigonzi , the last of the 118 families were settled.  86 families built their homes in the Chortizan colony and 32 families founded two new colonies. [Chortiza - 1848 Village History]


[The following is an excerpt from the book A Canadian Story by Gary W. Strahl, with permission from the author]

Many Mennonites left Prussia at the end of the 18th century and moved to the Ukraine area of Southern Russia. Family records show that Jakob Enns was born in 1796 in Prussia and came with his family to Russia in 1797.

In 1823 Jakob married Susanna Harder, who had been born in Prussia in 1797, and had come with her parents to Russia as a newborn baby. Initially they lived in the Chortiza colony where they had grown up, but later they moved to the Bergthal Colony that was established in 1836.

Jakob and Susanna (Harder) Enns had seven children, two of who died as infants. No information is available on any of these children except for the youngest, Franz, who was born in 1845. It is his story that we will follow next. Jakob died in Russia in 1863 at the age of 67, and Susanna died there in 1872 at the age of 75.

Franz Enns was born on May 24, 1845 to Jakob and Susanna Enns in South Russia. He was educated in a private German school. it is believed that he was an ardent student, as some of his German handwritten dccuments would indicate.

Franz Enns was baptised and became a member of the church in 1866. In this same group was Justina Unger, who was soon to become his bride. They were married on August 2, 1866. Justina's birthdate was January 3, 1847.

It is believed that Franz Enns and Justina Unger met and started their courtship when Justina was working on the neighboring farm to the Enns's as a maid (Knackshi).

Franz and Justina Enns started their first years of marriage with quite a struggle as economic conditions changed dramatically and land was not easily obtained. They built their house, called an "Erd Semlin", or a house built of mud blocks and pole rafters, with a sod roof, thatched with tall grass that grew in the lower swamp lands. This first home was built in the side of a hill, which sometimes created problems in the winter when snow would keep blowing into the entrance. A string from the house to the barn would serve as a guide during a severe winter storm.

Some of the more established Mennonites, with land already in their possession, had become outstanding people who were operating their own flour and feed grinding mills, blacksmith shops, raising grains, cattle and large gardens.

Approximately one-third fo the Mennonite population were landless squatters (Anwohner) and working for the wealthier farmers. This was also the case of the Franz Ennses. Their house had been built on a river bank which was crown land. Their first child, Helena, was born here.

In the spring of 1869 they were able to purchase an acreage consisting of seven acres, a house constructed of wood and a barn. They were now able to keep a few head of cattle and had a large garden. They also built a shop where neighbours would have their harnesses repaired. This became a career for Franz Enns and helped greatly with their livelihood.

In 1876 Franz and Justina joined those Mennonites dissatisfied with the Russian government who decided to move to North America.

Franz and Justian sold those possessions that they could not take with them. Their land and house were sold to a neighbor who let them stay until they were ready to leave for Canada. They began their overland journey to Hamburg in early May 1876 with their five children all under the age of eight; Helena (b. 1869), Franz (b. 1870), Heinrich (b. 1871), Gerhard (b. 1873) and Justina (b. 1875). Before they reached Liverpool, England, their sixth child, Anna, was born on May 21, 1876.

In mid-June the Enns family boarded the S.S.Quebec No. 22 in Liverpool for the approximately ten-day voyage to Quebec City. All told, there were 33 Mennonite families on board, totalling 225 persons. The group leaders were Franz Froese and David Giesbrecht.

It was between Liverpool and Quebec that one-year old Justina suddenly became ill and died within hours. She was placed in a makeshift wooden coffin and buried at sea. On June 23, 1876 the ship docked at Quebec City. The group now travelled by train to Collingwood, Ontario. Here they embardked on a lake barge which transported them across Lakes Huron and Superior to Duluth, Minnesota. There they took a train to Moorehead, on the Red River, where they switched to a paddle wheeler. The trip to Canada down the Red River took about three days. At the junction of the Red and Rat Rivers, the settlers disembarked and walked to the immigration sheds, five miles to the east.

Although they had finally arrived in Canada after two months of travel, the journey was not yet over. Most of the group was destined for the West Reserve, which required a further journey of 50 miles. By July 20, 1876 the Franz Enns family had arrived at the village of Eichenfeld, ten miles south of Morden, Manitoba.

Franz and Justina had three children born to them in Canada; Jacob (b. 1878), Abraham (b. 1880) and Maria (b. 1883). Their first-born daughter Helena (b. 1869), however, died before 1881, not having reached the age of 13. In April 1883 Franz Enns become a naturalized British subject. He and all his family were now Canadian citizens. This detail becomes important later in our story.

For two years the Enns family lived in the village of Eichenfeld, and then in 1878 Franz built a 20x28 house and a 20x12 stable on SW 14-T1-R5W. On September 17, 1879 he formally entered a homestead on this quarter section, and by April 1883 he had 45 acres in crop. On May 11, 1886 Franz was granted title to his land. Franz was 56 years old when he died on July 22, 1901. His wife Justina died in 1909 at the age of 62. [A Canadian Story by Gary W. Strahl (Pages 63-65)]


Franz Enns is also mentioned in an article with his wife Justina:

Franz Ens (May 28, 1845 - 1901) (der Grosse?)
Justina Unger (June 3, 1847 - ?)

There are only three Franz Ens’s listed in the Bergthal Gemeinde Buch, and all three appear in the Gnadenfeld Brotschuld list. One is Franz the husband of Maria Esau (designated as “kleine” ?), another is Franz the son of Peter Ens, husband of Maria Harder, and the third is Franz the husband of Justina Unger. The first Franz is discussed in detail in Part I of the article (June 1999); the name of the second Franz is stroked out in the Gnadenfeld list with out any itemizing of debts incurred, suggesting that his sojourn there was of short duration. Yet the family does connect to the grid of kinship, for his wife Maria Harder was the sister to Peter Harder also of Gnadenfeld, whose wife, Margaretha Krahn, was in turn Funk Jr. However, by 1880 this Franz Ens appears in Kronsgard, having homesteaded on SE10-5-5E.

The entry in the Brotschuld for the remaining Franz Ens is problematic, for although the ship lists clearly document his arrival in summer of 1876, the Brotschuld entries have him incurring various debts for cloth and flour etc. in Manitoba as early as April 1, 1875. His is also the only family with no apparent kinship ties to Gnadenfeld, and does not appear to have entered the Township Register for the East Reserve at all, certainly not for this area. Where exactly the family lived during the short time on the East Reserve can no longer be ascertained. Not surprisingly, by 1880 the family has already moved to the West Reserve. Perhaps the fact that the family emigrated from Osterwick, Khortitza serves as a plausible connection to Gnadenfeld, for the Esau sisters came from there as well. In the 1880 Federal Census, the Ens family is listed in Eichenfeld, a village south of Morden and about three miles from the International Boundary. They lived there until some time after 1901, when Franz died. Later, according to John Dyck, they moved “west”. (See John Dyck’s 1880 Village Census of the West Reserve, p. 171.) [
Preservings #15 (December 1999, page 94)]



FEHR NAME ORIGIN


  • The claim that "Fehr" refers to the profession of the ferryman is the oldest and most widely accepted speculation. However, it may not be correct. Note first of all that "Fehr" (at least in many of its branches) was originally written DeFehr, Defaehr, and so on. Most, but certainly not all families dropped the "de". But the first Mennonites who bore this name were Dutch and wrote it "de Veer" or "deVer" (etc.) and lived in the predominantly German region of Prussia, where the name was given a German spelling and pronunciation. So the question as to what "Fehr" means needs to changed into the question: What did the Dutch name "de Veer" mean? It may have referred to a ferryman (or else to "fair-haired"), but it is also not impossible that it means the persons originally came from the town of Veere (on the island of Walcheren in the southwest Netherlands). The earliest identified person of this name, Gysbert Jansz. de Veer, was born in Schiedam, Neth., a town to which a large number of Veere natives fled in the 16th century. I am of the opinion that the name Fehr means: "from Veere" [Meaning of the last name Fehr?]
  • Some interesting stories related to the Fehr's that are part of my family tree:


GUENTHER NAME ORIGIN


Patronymic, based on a common German first name; "gund" = battle + "heri" = army, hence "warrior in battle" or "defender".  The name is common in all German-speaking lands, and was also used in early Anglo-Saxon England.  In the Doomsday Book (11 century) names like Gonther and Gunter are listed as tenants.  The name was introduced into Mennonite congregations in West Prussia by converts.  According to Stumpp 7 Günther/Ginter families emigrated from West Prussia to Russia. [Mennonite Names, Victor Peters/Jack Thiessen, 1987 M 929.4 page 66]

The origin of the Guenther/Ginter family name can be found on the following page, which says:

Where does the Name Guenther come from?

  • From old German: gund (battle) and heri (army), thus: "Warrior" (Soldier, Militia, Mercenary).
    No wonder some of us Guenthers are so agressive ;-)
  • The earliest mention of the name dates back to 413 (legendary Gunther, King of Burgundy), and in a letter from Pope Gregory II in 722, found in the letter collection of Bonifatius, a reference to "Gundhareus" appears to be the earliest know Schwarzburger, a clan, whose lead name became Günther for the next eleven centuries.
  • There is nothing new about names being passed on in different spellings. Even the name Günther. We have speculated about some of the reasons for the differnet ways to spell Guenther (sorry, in English only).



THIESSEN NAME ORIGIN

  • North German and Danish: reduced form of the personal name Matthias or Mathies(s) (see Matthew) [Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4]
  • The German surname of THIESEN was a baptismal name 'the son of Mathew'. The name was found in medieval registers throughout Europe and means 'gracious gift of Jehovah'. It was an exceedingly popular font name during the 11th and 12th Centuries. This given name was of biblical origin, ultimately from the Hebrew male font name MATITYAHU, recorded in the Greek New Testament in the form MATTHIAS. The name has numerous variant spellings which include THIESS, THIES, DEUSS, THEWES, DIESING, MATHEW, MATHEY, MATHIE, MATHYS, MATEO, MATAS, MATTASER and MATESSIAN, to name but a few. Surnames which were derived from ancient Germanic personal names have the same meaning in many languages...[Thiesen Coat of Arms / Thiesen Family Crest]



FAMILY TREE


There are a few different ways to view my family tree information of 2200+ individuals:

  • The following SVG image shows more detailed genealogical line of Dare ('dot' control file created using my genealogy program MGedcom, and 'SVG' image created using dot (part of the graphviz program package):

SVG family tree created with graphviz dot


  • NEW! Using the amazing WebTrees graphical open source genealogy application, here is the starting page to view my family tree GEDCOM file (ask for ID if you need one):

JPG webtrees logo
Graphical Version


  • For an online text/HTML-based version created by gedcomToHTML.pl developed by Dan Pidcock, see here:

PNG gedcomtohtml
                    logo
Text/HTML Version

  • For a text chart just showing my direct ancestors back four generations, see the following:

Franz
Ens
1845-1901
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
SS Quebec 1
SS Quebec 2
SS Quebec 3
Land Grant
Death

Justina
Unger
1847-1909
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
SS Quebec 1
SS Quebec 2
SS Quebec 3
John
Hoeppner
1857-1946
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
1911 Census
1921 Census
SS Quebec 1
SS Quebec 2
SS Quebec 3
Land Grant

Katharina
Reimer
1859-1921
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
1911 Census
SS Quebec 1
SS Quebec 2
SS Quebec 3

Death
Jakob
Fehr
1837-1916
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census?
1906 Census
1911 Census?
SS Sarmatian 1
SS Sarmatian 2
SS Sarmation 3
Land Grant
Death?
Maria
Wiens
1835-1928
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census?
1906 Census
SS Sarmatian 1
SS Sarmatian 2
SS Sarmation 3
Abraham
Janzen
1842-1929
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1911 Census
SS Polynesian 1
SS Polynesian 2
SS Polynesian 3
Elizabeth
Penner
1846-1913
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
SS Polynesian 1
SS Polynesian 2
SS Polynesian 3
Death
Jakob
Ginter
1843-1904
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
Death
SS Peruvian 1
SS Peruvian 2
SS Peruvian 3
Death
Katherina
Wiebe
1843-1919
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
SS Peruvian 1
SS Peruvian 2
SS Peruvian 3
Jakob
Thiessen
1846-1924?
LDS Record
1901 Census
1911 Census
SS Warrington 1
SS Warrington 2
Death?
Anna
Reimer
1849-1924?
LDS Record
1901 Census
1911 Census
SS Warrington 1
SS Warrington 2
Death?
Diedrich
Thiessen
1844-1921
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census 1
1906 Census 2
1911 Census 1
1911 Census 2
1916 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
SS Canadian 1
SS Canadian 2
SS Canadian 3
Land Grant
Death
Elizabeth
Hamm
1858-1948?
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census 1
1906 Census 2
1911 Census 1
1911 Census 2
1916 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
SS
Canadian 1
SS Canadian 2
SS Canadian 3
Census
Johann
Ginter
1855-1901
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
SS Sardinian 1
SS Sardinian 2
SS Sardinian 3
Death
Anna
Wolfe
1858-1912
LDS Record
1891 Census
1901 Census
SS Canadian 1
SS Canadian 2
SS Canadian 3
                 
Abram Enns
1880-1966
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1911 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
Marriage
Elizabeth Hoeppner
1881-1945
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1911 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
Marriage
David Fehr
1871-1947
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1916 Census
1911 Census?
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
SS Sarmatian
Marriage
Elizabeth Janzen
1879-1958
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1916 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
Marriage
Jacob Ginter
1865-1927
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1911 Census
1916 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
SS Peruvian
Marriage?
Death
Anna Thiessen
1874-1951
1901 Census
1906 Census
1911 Census
1916 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
Marriage?
Diedrich Thiessen
1890-1975
1891 Census
1901 Census
1906 Census
1911 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
Marriage
Maria Ginter
1896-1930
1901 Census
1921 Census 1
1921 Census 2
Marriage
Death

John Enns
1906-1981
1911 Census
Birth
Helena Fehr
1909-1999
1911 Census
Birth
Henry Guenther
1910-1996
1911 Census
1916 Census
Birth
Anna Thiessen
1917-

Jacob Enns
1939-2004
Catherina Guenther
1941-

Darren Enns
1962-
Brenda Enns
1963-
Richard Enns
1965-


My GEDCOM was edited and cleaned up by another Linux program called FTree written by Clive Stubbings.

Much thanks go to:

Two other good online sources of Canadian mennonite church memberships from www.mennonitegenealogy.com (MMHS) are:

Another good source for some genealogy data is:
  
        http://www.wikitree.com/

Helpful Census and Record links:

A very useful online tool for checking GEDCOM integrity is Bonkers: The GEDCOM Sanity Checker!

For interest, here is a graph showing just my own personal direct ancestry tree:

SVG darren tree

Arbitrarily going back 5 generations in my own family tree, here is the numeric distribution of surnames that make up my genome:

      4    wiebe
      4    penner
      3    guenther
      2    wiens
      2    fehr
      2    enns
      1    wolfe
      1    thiessen
      1    reimer
      1    neufeld
      1    loewen
      1    janzen
      1    hoeppner
      1    hiebert
      1    harder
      1    hamm

In other words, I am more 'Wiebe' and 'Penner' than I am 'Enns' :)



EMIGRATION SHIP HISTORY

JPG
                      migration 1876 crop

The above JPG image shows a map of the journey from the Neu-Osterwick village of the Chortitiza colony in the Ukraine to the homestead area near Morden Manitoba Canada in 1876 (the nifty utility that created this is called 'xplanet' found at http://xplanet.sourceforge.net/ using the following command: xplanet -projection orthographic -config xplanet.conf -latitude 50 -longitude -30 -num_times 1 -geometry 800x800 -output migration1876.jpg -radius 50 -fontsize 10 -font Arial -pango)



SS QUEBEC

JPG City of
                                                  Dublin Ship painting
                                                  1869 by John Frederick
                                                  Loos

(the ship that brought Franz & Justina Ens (and family) to Canada in June 1876)

Finally, after a 30+ year search for some sort of photo or illustration of the SS Quebec, I stumbled across a small image of the painting shown above, painted in 1869 by John Frederick Loos of the SS City of Dublin, which was the ship name before it was sold to the Dominion Line in 1873.  Here is a link to the original that I found, and here is that image.   Here is where I got the one shown above (apparently color-adjusted from the original).

For another nice full-sized illustration of a ship very similar to the size/timeframe of the SS Quebec click this link.

For a direct link to an HTML page that contains the other passengers on the same voyage, see this link. For the actual page that shows their entry on that voyage, see this link.  For a good general resource page on Mennonite groups associated with my heritage, see this link to the MMHS website.

NEW!  While browsing Library and Archives Canada, I stumbled across this obscure reference to a ship named 'SS Quebec': L. STAFFORD, QUEBEC. ARRIVAL SS "QUEBEC".  I made inquiries, and eventually acquired a digital image of this correspondence confirming that this was the SS Quebec arrival of my Enns ancestors, shown here:

JPG cover
                          letter
JPG letter

This confirms how poor the arriving Mennonites were -- so much so that L Stafford Colleet made an appeal to waive some sort of 'transport' fee.  Here is a link to an interesting 1879 Montreal Gazette article on the history of the Montreal Telegraph Company.

Another good site for ship info is Norway Heritage.  A very good source of technical information for the Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping is Mystic Seaport.  The Immigrants to Canada is also good for info.

The ship that brought the Enns family over to Canada from Russia was the "SS Quebec". General information on the ship and the line(s) to which it belonged are described below. The ship departed from Liverpool on June 8/1876 and docked in Quebec on June 23/1876 (15 days). It was the 22nd ship arriving in Quebec in 1876, and the 18th ship containing Mennonite immigrants. The captain of the SS Quebec during this time was Captain J. Thearle (not W. Bennett as previously guessed, though he was Captain on earlier and later voyages). The leaders of the group were David Giesbrecht and Franz Froese. The origin of the group was the Fuerstenland colony in south Russia (a daughter colony of Chortitza settlement). There were 225 Mennonites on board, including the 8 members of the Franz & Justina Enns family. One of their children (Justina) apparently died during the voyage. Some sort of processing fee was paid in Toronto on June 26/1876 ($16.98).  By coincidence, the Peter & Elizabeth Hoeppner family was also on this ship -- Peter being a grandson of the first delegate chosen in Danzig to act as a negotiator with the Russian government with regards to the migration of Mennonites to Russia in 1788! 

NEW!  Through the magic of Google searches and scanned documents, more information re: Captain J. Thearle came to light: Full name John Thomas Thearle, born in 1831, from Plymouth, the son of a mariner, became a mariner himself in 1846 (age 15), became a ships' mate in 1852 (age 21) aboard the steamship "Olinda" under Captain George Hugh Haram, was 2nd mate in 1854 when the "Olinda" was involved in a wreck during its 2nd voyage, presented testimony at an investigation that same year, married in 1858 (age 27),  and eventually became captain of the "SS Quebec" for the voyage of my Enns ancestors in 1876 (age 45).

A small mystery is what colony Franz and Justina lived in before emigrating to Canada --  Fuerstenland (from which others on their journey originated) or Neu-Osterwick (which various other records suggest)?  Yet another record indicates that Franz was born in the Bergthal colony.

Since the journey took 15 days, and the distance between Liverpool and Quebec City by ship is 2649 miles, this means that the average speed was 7.4 mi/hr or 11.8 km/hr or 6.4 knots.  This is another mystery, considering that the average steamship speed for this route at the time was 9.5 days (11.7 mi/hr or 18.8 km/hr or 10.2 knots)!  Other accounts suggest that the average route time was 12 days -- in which case this journey was slightly slower.

Now for the general historical information about this ship and its line...

The QUEBEC was built by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow. She was a 2,138 gross ton ship, length 318ft x beam 36.3ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Laid down for British owners as the HELLESPONT, she was bought on the stocks by the Inman Line of Liverpool and launched in February 1864 as the CITY OF DUBLIN. She started her maiden voyage on 10/12/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage on this service commenced 2/4/1872 and she was then purchased by the Dominion Line of Liverpool, and fitted with compound engines by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. She started a single round voyage between Liverpool and Boston on 19/2/1874 and was then renamed QUEBEC. She commenced Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 16/4/1874 and started Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 30/4/1886. Her last voyage between Avonmouth, Swansea and New York started on 16/12/1887 and in 1888 she was sold to French owners and renamed NAUTIQUE. On 16/2/1890 she was abandoned and lost in the North Atlantic. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.241] [Immigrant Ships and ShipsList]

Laid down in the Glasgow yards of Smith & Rodger as the Hellespont, her iron hull was purchased on the stocks by the Inman Line who renamed her City of Dublin prior to her launching in February 1864. Completed later the same year, she was registered at 2,138 tons gross and measured 318 feet in length with a 36 foot beam. Driven by a single screw powered by a beam-geared 2-cylinder engine, she could cruise at 11 knots and carried accommodation for 100 Cabin and 400 Third Class passengers. After eight years of scheduled Liverpool to New York sailings, she was sold to the Dominion Line in 1873, fitted with new compound engines and put to work on their Liverpool to Boston run. After only one return voyage, she was renamed Quebec and transferred to their Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal route where she remained, apart from a change of home port to Avonmouth, until December 1887. Sold to French owners in 1888 and renamed Nautique, she foundered after being abandoned in a sinking condition in the North Atlantic on 16th February 1890. [Christie's Auction Services]

[1864] Built as Hellespont for British owners. Acquired by Inman line. Sept 3: First voyage Liverpool-New York. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

[1864] City of Dublin Bt Smith & Rogers, Glasgow; T: 2,138 g. Dim 318 ft (96.93m) x 36 ft 3 in (11.05 m) x 29 ft 5 in (8.97 m). Eng Sgl scr, beam geared; 2 cyls, 11 kts. H Iron, 2 decks; Pas: 100 cabin, 400 3rd. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

[1864] (Similar entry to above) Laid down as Hellespont for W. Dixon, British. Acquired on the stocks. Sept 3: Renamed City of Dublin, Inman Line. Liverpool-Quebec-Montreal. Replacement for Missouri (8), lost Oct 1. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

[1864] The Inman Line fleet was reinforced by a sister ship to the City of New York, the City of London, (1863, 2,560 tons). The major difference between the two vessels was in their machinery. The City of New York had two-cylinder horizontal trunk engines, whereas the the City of London had four-cylinder inverted engines. Besides the fact that war freight to the United States more than justified fleet expansion, disasters always loomed over the horizon. The City of New York was steaming fast toward Queenstown on a homeward crossing from New York when she struck the submerged seamount known as Daunt's Rock and became a total loss. The accident occurred early on the morning of 29 March 1864, and the potential for human tragedy was great, but all passengers and crew were saved. Inman surveyed the ship market as quickly as possible for a replacement and Smith & Rodger, Glasgow, Scotland, had a 2138 ton vessel building which appeared to meet the bill. She bore the name Hellespont, but was purchased by Inman and launched as the City of Dublin in February 1864. As prepared for Inman service the liner was outfitted with around 100 cabin class berths and accommodation for nearly a thousand steerage passengers. She made her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York on 10 December 1864, the fitting out taking a little longer than
expected. William Inman was moving through his second decade of operation with what might be regarded as the best balanced fleet on the North Atlantic. [The Inman Steamship Company Limited: Innovation and Competition on the North Atlantic, 1850-1886]

[1864] Dec 17: The ship "Burnside" of Greenock, while on a voyage from New York to Liverpool, became waterlogged, and was struck by a heavy sea which caused her to heel over, and eight of her crew were washed overboard.  She afterwards righted, but two more were washed away, and two died from exposure. The remaining three, after enduring the greatest sufferings from cold and exposure for six days, were rescued by the "City of Dublin," about 900 miles west of Cape Clear. On account of the heavy sea running, and the danger of approaching the wreck, the rescue of the survivors was attended with great difficulty and danger to Mr. Fletcher and the boat's crew. [Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons and Command, Volume 65, p 66][New York Times, Dec 29, 1864]

[1872] List or Manifest OF ALL THE PASSENGERS taken on board the SS City of Dublin whereof William Jamieson is Master, from Liverpool burthen 1548 tons. [Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild]

PNG inman line ad

[1873] Became Quebec (Dominion Line). Compound engines fitted; Cyls: 46 in (116.84 cm) and 78 in (198.12 cm); Stroke: 42 in (106.68 cm); 275 HP; Stm P: 60 lb; by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

[1874] Montreal Witness of May 5, 1874: Serious loss and delay have been experienced by steamers owing to the continued obstruction of the river by the ice-bridge at Quebec. The "Sarmatian" has been kept waiting below at Indian Cove for nearly a week in consequence, and owing to the difficulty of landing has had to keep her steerage passengers on board all the time. The SS. "Quebec" of the of the Dominion line contrived to have her passengers landed, and it is stated those from the "Sarmatian" will also be landed to-day. Other vessels are also detained below and the number is being fast augmented. Efforts are being made to break up the ice obstruction, which, it is hoped, will be effected to-day. Fears are expressed that the ice at Cap Rouge will hold for some time longer, but from Three Rivers it is reported that the Lake ice had been passing down rapidly, and it is to be hoped that at Cap Rouge will also give way speedily. [TheShipsList]

[1875] Aug 20, A steamer having a clear course altered it to go to the south and pass between two other vessels, and in attempting to do so collided with both.  The fact of one of such vessels having very improperly altered her helm, and contributed materially to the collisions does not relieve the steamer from the liability to make good the injuries sustained by the vessel, which did not contribute to the accident.  The Quebec -- Bennett, p 32. [Cases selected from those Heard and Determined in the Vice-Admiralty Court at Quebec Involving Questions of Maritime Law][detail]

[1875] Nov 5, The Central Law Journal, Volume 2, page 725: Collision of Vessels -- The S.S. Quebec, Bennett; Vice-Admiralty Court.  Opinion of Y. Okill Stuart, J. [19 Low, Can. J. 195]. A steamship, after colliding with a sailing vessel, continued her course and struck another sailing ship.  Held, that the steamship that had disregarded the rules of navigation before the first collision, could not plead the fault of the vessel first struck, to a suit brought against her for the second collision...Collision between Steam and Sail Vessels. -- The S.S. Quebec v. The Charles Chalomer; and vice versa; same court and judge. [19 Low. Can. J. 201].  Held, where a steamboat did not keep out of the way of a sailing ship, there being risk of collision, and the sailing ship, by porting her helm, instead of keeping her course, contributed to the collision, both held to be in fault and neither entitled to recover the damage she sustained. [The Central Law Journal]

[1875] Oct 15, Where one steamship overtook another in a shallow channel, in the river St. Lawrence, and a collision ensued, the overtaking vessel declared to be in fault.  The Quebec -- Thearle, p 37. [Cases selected from those Heard and Determined in the Vice-Admiralty Court at Quebec Involving Questions of Maritime Law][detail]

[1876] May 11 The SS "Quebec" from Liverpool to Quebec reported having seen a few icebergs. Had fine clear weather until 20 miles above the Bird Rocks then the ship got into field ice and steamed 120 miles through it. On the 9th 15 miles off Cape Rozier, the ship passed two Norwegian barques below the Bird Rocks and saw 11 sails in the ice. (LL). [Ice Charts & Ship/Iceberg Database]


This ad comes from a very interesting traveler's book from 1876 called The Year Book and Almanac of Canada for 1876, confirming the Captain on that voyage as 'Thearle':

PNG 1876 dominion line
                      ad

Here is what the entry in the Lloyd's Register of British and Foreign Shipping for 1877/1877 for the 'Quebec' looks like:

PNG
                    lloyds 1876 1877

[1879] In September, 1879, the SS Quebec, a Dominion Line steamer on a voyage from Halifax to Montreal with 60 passengers, had struck within a few yards of where the Phoenix met her fate. After the crew jettisoned her cargo of sugar, salt, and iron, she slipped off the reef and continued on her voyage. Evidence before a Court of Inquiry of the Board of Trade into that incident showed conclusively "that the accident occurred through miscalculation of the distance of the light from the reef, the master supposing it to be upon the hill of the Point." "On the hill of the Point" was where East Point Lighthouse was marked on Admiralty Charts. In fact, the tower, which had been built in 1867, stood half a mile south of southwest of the Point. The Chart location was in error. [The Wreck of the Phoenix] [Daily Telegraph Newspaper article 1879/09/04]

[1882] Apr 25 SS "Quebec" met heavy ice 46o31'N 47oW from which she did not clear until May 1; Apr 29, 47o32'N 59o35'W; Gulf completely blocked. [Ice Charts & Ship/Iceberg Database]

[1883] Feb 19 Safe Arrival off the Port. The anxiety which has been felt respecting the delay of the arrival at the home port of the Quebec, of the Dominion line, will be set at rest by knowledge of the fact that she was off Holyhead at a quarter-past eight this morning, accompanied by, but not in tow of, the tug Gamecock, of Liverpool. Beyond delay, all is well, and the vessel is expected to come into the river Mersey this evening. [The Liverpool, Monday February 19, 1883]

[1883] Mar 9 The Voyage of the S.S. Quebec. Presentation to the Officers and Crew. A crowded meeting of Shipowners, Merchants, Shipmasters, and others was held at the Rooms of the Mercantile Marine Service Assocation, on the 9th March, when a sum of 1,000 guineas, given by the Liverpool Underwriters, was distributed amongst the Officers and crew of the steamer "Quebec", of the Mississippi and Dominion Line, in recognition of the skill and devotion displayed in navigating that vessel safely to Liverpool, after her rudder had been carried away in the Atlantic...others present were Messrs. Montgomery, Flinn & Hill, of the Mississippi and Dominion Steamship company, owners of the "Quebec"...and Captain Gibson and the Officers and crew of the "Quebec". [H 387.06 MER Mercantile Marine Service Assocation Reporter Vol VIII 1883]

[1883-1888] On Avonmouth berth. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

[1883] (Similar to entry above) Sold. Renamed Nautique. Owned by Bossiere Freres & Cie, France. [Merchant Fleets in Profile][1888] QUEBEC, ex. HELLESPONT, ex. CITY OF DUBLIN Code letters: VWHQ Official Number: 48807 Rigging: iron single screw steam Bark; 3 decks; partial Shade Deck; 6 cemented bulkheads Tonnage: 2,621 tons gross, 1,991 under deck and 1,732 net Dimensions: 318 feet long, 36.3 foot beam and holds 29.5 feet deep; Poop 80 tons; Forecastle 24 tons Construction: 1864, Smith & Rodger in Glagow Propulsion: compound engine with 2 inverted cylinders of 46 & 78 inches diameter respectively; stroke 42 inches; operating at 55 p.s.i.; 300 horsepower; new engine & boilers in 1873; engine built by Laird Bros. in Birkenhead Owners: Mississippi & Dominion Steam Ship Co. Ltd.  Port of registry: Liverpool [Gilbert Provost - from his research using Lloyd's Register -- much thanks!]

[1890] Feb 10: Foundered in North Atlantic. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]
The Liverpool and Mississippi Steamship Company was founded in 1870. In 1872, the name was changed to Mississippi and Dominion Steamship Company. Originally it was to sail from Liverpool to New Orleans via Bordeaux, Lisbon and Havana. Later a route from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal was added in the summer. The New Orleans route was abandoned and the Line continued the Canada route and added a Portland, Maine route in the winter. Later a Bristol to Montreal route was also added. All but the Vancouver carried livestock. The Dominion Line began to run a joint service with the White Star Line in 1909. In 1921, the company became Frederick Leyland & Company, Ltd. The Ships List

JPG Dominion Line booklet cover

This ad comes from a very interesting traveler's book from 1882 called Palmer's European Pocket Guide with Telegraph Code for Travelers:

PNG 1882 Dominion Line ad

Some image of logos, etc. from Steamship China Collector (now unfortunately no longer existing):

JPG pic of Dominion Line
                          logo JPG pic of Dominion Line
                          logo

NEW!  An actual artifact from the Dominion Line series of china from The Flying Tiger Antiques:

JPG eggcup dominion line


[1883] (Similar to entry above) Sold. Renamed Nautique. Owned by Bossiere Freres & Cie, France. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

[1888] QUEBEC, ex. HELLESPONT, ex. CITY OF DUBLIN Code letters: VWHQ Official Number: 48807 Rigging: iron single screw steam Bark; 3 decks; partial Shade Deck; 6 cemented bulkheads Tonnage: 2,621 tons gross, 1,991 under deck and 1,732 net Dimensions: 318 feet long, 36.3 foot beam and holds 29.5 feet deep; Poop 80 tons; Forecastle 24 tons Construction: 1864, Smith & Rodger in Glagow Propulsion: compound engine with 2 inverted cylinders of 46 & 78 inches diameter respectively; stroke 42 inches; operating at 55 p.s.i.; 300 horsepower; new engine & boilers in 1873; engine built by Laird Bros. in Birkenhead Owners: Mississippi & Dominion Steam Ship Co. Ltd.  Port of registry: Liverpool [Gilbert Provost - from his research using Lloyd's Register -- much thanks!]

[1890] Feb 10: Foundered in North Atlantic. [Merchant Fleets in Profile]

Grey River Argus 1980/04/02

PNG Nautique end #1

Montreal Herald 1890/03/01

PNG Nautique #2

The Press 1890/02/27

PNG Nautique #3


Rockland County Journal 1890/03/01

PNG nautique
                      story

Corunna Journal 1890/03/06

PNG nautique article

[1902] J. Pierpont Morgan started consolidating his shipping activities. A new conglomerate came into existance under the name of International Mercantile and Marine Company. Through this holding, J. Pierpont Morgan not only controlled the International Navigation Company of New Jersey (with the Red Star Line) but also the International Navigation Company of New Jersey, the International Navigation Company of Liverpool, as well as other shipping lines, such as the White Star Line, the Atlantic Transport Line, the Dominion Line, and the Leyland Line. The total fleet comprised 133 units. Red Star Line

From the Mystic Seaport database, here are the search results showing the history of this ship:

City of Dublin:

Quebec:

  • Quebec (steamer) American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1875) 
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Bennett Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1875)
  • Quebec (steamer) American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1876)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Bennett, Wm. Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1876)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Thearle American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1877)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Bennett, Wm. Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1877)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Thearle Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1878)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Thearle American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1878)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Thearle American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1879)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Thearle Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1879)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Gibson, M. American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1880)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale, G. S. Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1881) 
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1881)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1882)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale, G. S. Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1882)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale, G. S. Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1883)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale American Lloyd's Register of American and Foreign Shipping (1883)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Dale, G. S. Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1884)
  • Quebec (steamer) Master - Davies Record of American and Foreign Shipping (1889)

Nautique:

Note: A similar search can be made on the same site for the history of individual captains, including John Thomas Thearle, including his function as Master of the SS Quebec in 1876:  Thearle - Quebec (steamer).

HANSA

JPG for
                  Hansa Steamship

NEW!  From a free Ancestors.com weekend on Labor Day 2013, I found out another tidbit: the name of the small steamship that brought the Ens family from Hamburg, Germany to (presumably) Grimsby, England -- which was then followed by the ocean voyage to Canada from Liverpool.  The ship was named HansaThe captain at this time was named 'Brandt':

The steamship EPTANISOS was built under Lloyd's Register of Shipping Special Survey for the Anglo-Greek Steam Navigation & Trading Co by Richardson, Duck & Co, Stockton-on-Tees, and was launched in February 1865. 747/588 tons (gross/net); 198.8 x 29.1 x 16.7 feet (length x breadth x depth of hold); iron construction, screw propulsion.

On 12 April 1867, the EPTANISOS was purchased from Richardson by the Hamburg firm of H. J. Perlbach & Co, and renamed HANSA.

The HANSA ex EPTANISOS was sunk on 7 April 1892, after a collision, off the Dutch coast.

Here and here are some other links.

SS PERUVIAN

JPG Picture of SS
                                                Peruvian

(the ship that brought Jacob & Katherina Ginter (and family) to Canada in June 1875)

For a direct link to an HTML page that contains the other passengers on the same voyage, see this link.

The ship that brought the Ginter family over to Canada from Russia was the "SS Peruvian". General information on the ship and the line(s) to which it belonged are described below. The ship docked in Quebec on July 13/1875. It was the 30th ship arriving in Quebec in 1875.  The captain of the SS Peruvian during this time was Captain SmithThe leaders of the group were Johann Mueller, Johann Wiebe, Johann Gerbrand and Johann EnnsThe origin of the group was the Chortitza and Bergthal colonies in south Russia.

Now for the general information about this ship and its line...

Built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1863 for the Allan Line, she was a 2549 gross ton ship, length 312.1ft x beam 38.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st class and 600-3rd class passengers. An attempted launch was made on 21st Aug. 1863 but she stuck on the slipway and the launch was completed on 31st Aug. 1863. She sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Portland on 31st March 1864 and commenced her first run from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 12th May 1864. First voyage from Liverpool to Halifax, Norfolk and Baltimore commenced 11th Aug. 1871. In 1874 she was lengthened to 373.1ft, 3038 tons and her engines compounded, and on 14th July 1874 resumed the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service. On 26th April 1887 resumed Liverpool - Baltimore service and in 1890-1891 was fitted with new compound engines and given a second funnel. Commenced a Glasgow - Boston service on 6th Feb. 1891 and a Glasgow - New York service on 9th June 1893. She commenced her last voyage from Glasgow - New York on 7th Dec. 1894 and resumed Glasgow - Boston run on 18th Jan. 1895. On 6th May 1902 she started a Liverpool - St.Johns NF - Halifax run, starting her last voyage on 7th Nov. 1903 and was finally scrapped in Italy in 1905. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor.vol.1, p.310] [ShipsList and Norway Heritage]

JPG Picture of Allan
                      line logo


OTHER SHIPS

Other ships that brought my ancestors to Canada include:

JPG SS Canadian
SS Canadian (Allan Line)

[brought Diedrich & Helena Thiessen, and Johann & Anna Wolf (and daughter Anna, who married Johann Ginter), and Peter & Elizabeth Hamm and Peter & Helena Heide July 19/1875]

The CANADIAN owned by the Allan Line was a 2,911 gross ton ship built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool in 1872. Her details were - length 349.9ft x beam 35.6ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 25-1st and 850-2nd class. Launched in August 1872, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 23/8/1873. On 2/12/1873 she commenced her first Liverpool - St John's NF - Halifax - Baltimore voyage and on 14/5/1874 started her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal crossing. She inaugurated a Glasgow - Montevideo - Buenos Aires service for the Allan Line when she sailed from Glasgow on 11/11/1876 and in 1882 was chartered as a troopship for the Egyptian Expedition. Her first Glasgow - Boston sailing started on 21/5/1884 and her first Glasgow - Philadelphia sailing on 25/6/1884. She left Glasgow on her last North Atlantic voyage on 1/10/1891 and her last Glasgow - S.America voyage on 22/9/1902. She was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.314] [The Ship List]


JPG SS Sardinian
SS Sardinian (Allan Line)

[brought Johann Ginter (single at this time) July 30/1876
]

The SARDINIAN was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1874 for the Allan Line. She was a 4,399 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 42.3ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 120-1st and 850-3rd class. Launched on 3rd June 1874, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 29th July 1875. On 10th May 1878 she had an explosion in her bunkers at Moville, Ireland, followed by a fire. She was scuttled to extinguish the fire but subsequently refloated and repaired and resumed sailings between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal on 27th June 1878. In 1897 she was fitted with triple expansion engines by Wm.Denny, Dumbarton and one of her masts removed and on 19th June 1897 commenced her first voyage from Glasgow to Quebec and Montreal. On 16th Dec. 1897 she started her first Glasgow - New York sailing and commenced her last voyage on this route on 20th Dec. 1902. She started sailings between London - Quebec and Montreal, with 2nd and 3rd class passengers only on 20th May 1905 and on 31st July 1912 commenced Glasgow - Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings. Between 27th May 1914 and 7th Dec. 1914 she ran between Glasgow and Boston and in 1917 went to Canadian Pacific Ocean Services together with the rest of the Allan Line fleet. On 20th Sept. 1918 she commenced her first voyage for her new owners when she left London for Quebec and Montreal and on 24th Nov. 1918 made her first voyage after the Armistice, from Glasgow to St John NB with cargo only. She commenced sailings between Avonmouth - Quebec and Montreal on 17th May 1919 and started her last voyage from Avonmouth to St John NB on 21st Dec. 1919. She was sold on 8th Dec. 1920 and became a hulk at Vigo. On 22nd June 1938 she was towed to Bilbao and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.01,p.314] [The Ship List]


SS Polynesian

The POLYNESIAN was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1872 for the Montreal Ocean SS Co. She was a 3,983 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 42.5ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st and 850-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12th Feb. 1872, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 3rd. Oct. 1872. She started her last voyage on this service on 23rd July 1891 and on 8th Dec. 1891 commenced the first of two round voyages between Liverpool and Baltimore. In 1893 she was rebuilt to 4,522 gross tons, fitted with triple-expansion engines by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, one mast removed and given accommodation for 36-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Renamed LAURENTIAN, she resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 27th April 1893. On 31st August 1899 she commenced her first Glasgow - New York voyage and started her last voyage on this route on 10th Feb. 1905. She started her first Glasgow - Boston sailing on 17th March 1905 and her first Glasgow - Philadelphia voyage on 22nd April 1905. In 1906 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only and on 20th August 1909 made her last Glasgow - Boston sailing. She was wrecked at Trepassey Bay, Newfoundland on 6th Sept. 1909 with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by  N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.314] [The Ships List]



JPG SS Sarmatian

SS Sarmatian (Allan Line)
[brought Jacob & Maria Fehr July 6/1875]


The SARMATIAN was a 3,647 gross ton ship, length 370.9ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 850-3rd class passengers. Built by R. Steele & Co, Greenock (engines by Macnab & Co, Greenock), she was launched for the Allan Line on 7th Mar.1871. Her maiden voyage started on 31st Aug.1871 when she sailed from Liverpool for Quebec and Montreal and 1874 she was chartered for use as a troopship for the Ashanti Expedition. Her last voyage from Liverpool started on 3rd Jan.1889 when she sailed for Halifax and Portland and on 21st Jun.1889 she commenced her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing. Fitted with triple expansion engines in 1890, she resumed Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 25th Apr.1890. In 1900 her accommodation was re-classified as 2nd and 3rd class only and on 3rd Jun.1903 she commenced her first Glasgow - Boston voyage. Her first London - Quebec - Montreal sailing started on 22nd Apr.1905 and her final sailing started on 20th Jul.1907 when she left Boston for Glasgow. In 1908 she was scrapped at Rotterdam.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.313-4] [The Ships List]

This ad comes for the Allan Line from a very interesting traveler's book from 1875 called A Graphic Description of the Dominion of Canada and its Provinces:

PNG Allan Line Poster



JPG SS Quebec

[brought John & Katherina Hoeppner June 23/1876, and Peter & Elizabeth Penner June 23/1876 (his parents) as well]

(detail above) The QUEBEC was built by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow. She was a 2,138 gross ton ship, length 318ft x beam 36.3ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Laid down for British owners as the HELLESPONT, she was bought on the stocks by the Inman Line of Liverpool and launched in February 1864 as the CITY OF DUBLIN. She started her maiden voyage on 10/12/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage on this service commenced 2/4/1872 and she was then purchased by the Dominion Line of Liverpool, and fitted with compound engines by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. She started a single round voyage between Liverpool and Boston on 19/2/1874 and was then renamed QUEBEC. She commenced Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 16/4/1874 and started Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 30/4/1886. Her last voyage between Avonmouth, Swansea and New York started on 16/12/1887 and in 1888 she was sold to French owners and renamed NAUTIQUE. On 16/2/1890 she was abandoned and lost in the North Atlantic. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.241] [The Ships List]

????
[brought Jacob & Anna Thiessen 1892]

I continue to have no idea what ship brought this family to Canada.  This page contains entries for the unusual 1892 migration year:

1892 1786/99 0004 Thiesen Jacob Russland 1844/1845 Gretna i 230093  
1892 1786/99 0005 Thiesen Anna Russland 1846/1847 Gretna i 230094  
1892 1786/99 0006 Thiesen Anna Russland 1874/1875 Gretna i 230095  
1892 1786/99 0007 Thiesen Catharina Russland 1875/1876 Gretna i 229377  
1892 1786/99 0008 Thiesen Susanna Russland 1876/1877 Gretna i 230096  
1892 1786/99 0009 Thiesen Maria Russland 1878/1879 Gretna i 230097  
1892 1786/99 0010 Thiesen Sarah Russland 1880/1881 Gretna i 230098  
1892 1786/99 0011 Thiesen Justina Russland 1882/1883 Gretna i 230099  
1892 1786/99 0012 Thiesen Aganeta Russland 1884/1885 Gretna i 230100  
1892 1786/99 0013 Thiesen Jacob Russland 1885/1886 Gretna i 230101  
1892 1786/99 0014 Thiesen Peter Russland 1887/1888 Gretna i 230102  
1892 1786/99 0015 Thiesen Helena Russland 1890/1891 Gretna i 151125  

This page offers some suggestions for candidates, but ultimately cannot provide a solution, for the reasons mentioned :(

NEW!  Thanks to Andrea of BallinStadt, I now know that the 'SS Warrington' brought the Thiessen family from Hamburg, Germany to Grimsby, England on July 29, 1892!  The captain was named 'Green', the ship was a 'steamship', and it flew the flag of England.  However, I have been unable to determine which ship brought them from Liverpool, England to Canada.  The 'SS Warrington' was part of the 'Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincolnshire Railway Company' feeder line, built in 1886 and wrecked in 1903.  The Thiessen family was from the village of Burwalde (Chortitza colony) in Russia, and was destined for Gretna, Manitoba, Canada.

Here is part of an ad for the Great Railway Company which shows typical ferry ships that included the 'SS' Warrington':

JPG Great Railway
                                Company ships

Here is an ad for the Great Railway Company, which later owned the 'SS Warrington':

JPG Great Railway Company ad


THE JOURNEY

There are no personal stories to be told of the ocean voyages of my ancestors directly, but there are plenty of images and anecdotes from other immigrant steamship journeys of that era, and most are very unpleasant.  The 'good news' was that steamships were much faster than sailing ships, and this reduced the travel time from 6-8 weeks down to 10-12 days!  It would seem that the Mennonites traveled as 3rd-class passengers i.e. "steerage class':

JPG steerage 1872

The Canadian Government printed useful immigration booklets annually, with good practical advise on preparation for the journey, and life in Canada upon arrival:

PNG advise 1
PNG advice #2

One mystery is whether food was prepared for the steerage-class Mennonite travelers, or if instead food and cooking supplies were provided?  For 'intermediate' passengers, here is an example of a interesting but simple 'Bill of Fare' (menu) for the time (1883):

JPG bill of fare allan line

In contrast, steerage-class passengers appeared to have less meat as part of their fare.  Here is another account of life on the Inman line for steerage passengers (Hartford Weekly Times, Aug 11, 1881):

PNG inman line life 1881

Here is another very interesting account of life in steerage class:

A young man who crossed in the last year described his fare to the writer, thus : " At breakfast," he said, " we usually had oatmeal porridge and molasses, with coffee in plenty, rolls and butter. This was varied by bash instead of porridge on some days, or perhaps an Irish stew ; but fresh baked rolls and butter were always in abundance. There was always soup at dinner, and some boiled beef, pork, or fish, with potatoes and bread. Supper did not amount to much, but there was plenty of plain, good stuff to eat. Roast beef and plum duff were served at Sunday's dinner."

This food was served to the passengers by stewards, but there was no placing of dishes opposite the passenger's plate. The general meal was set down in the middle of the table, and "help yourself " was the order of the day. The passengers do not cook their own food now, but they have to provide their own cups, plates, and other utensils, as well as their own bedding.

All captains of passenger steamships are scrupulously attentive to the needs of their passengers. Not a day passes that they do not make a personal inspection of this department, and they are always approachable in the event of complaints arising on the part of the poorest travelers. [Procedures for processing Immigrants onboard Steamships - Ocean Passenger Travel]


This is the scene that would have greeted my ancestors as they arrived in Quebec around the time of the migrations:

JPG quebec city

This is the scene that would have greeted my ancestors as they passed Montreal:

JPG port of montreal 1874

Here is part of of a traveler's book for 1876 with calendar and political information:

PNG
                    1876 calendar page 1

PNG
                    1876 calendar page 2

LAND GRANT DEEDS


Here is an interesting page from the Journals of the House of Commons of the Dominion of Canada, Volume 10 discussing the reservation of land for Mennonites in 1876:

PNG parlimentary report on reserves

Here is the application for a Homestead Patent for Franz Ens in 1883:

JPG pic of Land
                          Deed Application (1883/04/05) [CLICK FOR
                          LARGER]

Some attempts to interpret the photocopies of microfilms of the original land grant applications made before the actual land grant was made in 1886:

Thanks go to the Provincial Archives of Manitoba for providing facilities to view the microfilms that they have stored there for this purpose.

  JPG pic of Land Deed Cover (1886) [CLICK
                          FOR LARGER]
JPG pic of Land Deed
                          Document (1886) [CLICK FOR LARGER]

Thanks go to the Morden Land Titles Office for providing access to the original land grant documents (just before being moved and put into non-public storage forever!).

The Canada ArchiviaNet Western Land Grants also has an image of the land grant deed available!


MAPS

Maps related to the History of the Enns Family

Initial Mennonite migration from Vistula Delta, Prussia to Chortitza Colony, Russia (© Mennonite Heritage Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba):

PNG prussia to russia

Mennonite colonies of southern Russia (© Mennonite Heritage Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba):

PNG mennonite colonies south russia

Bergthal daughter colony in which Franz Ens was born (© Mennonite Heritage Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba):

PNG bergthal colony

Nue-Osterwick village in Chortisa colony from which Franz Ens and wife Justina originated (© Mennonite Heritage Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba):

PNG nue-osterwick

Fuerstenland daughter colony from which Franz Ens and wife Justina emmigrated from (© Mennonite Heritage Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba):

PNG fuerstenland map

This map comes from a very interesting traveler's book from 1882 called Palmer's European Pocket Guide with Telegraph Code for Travelers:PNG atlantic map

Map of Manitoba West Reserve (© Mennonite Heritage Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba):

PNG west reserve
Another good map of Manitoba West Reserve with markers for original villages (© Ernest Unrau at Kronsfeld Cemetary Memorial Project):

PNG south manitoba mennonite villages


Village map of Eichenfeld where Franz and Justina first lived in Manitoba -- linked to the Manitoba homestead land grants in Township 1 Range 5 & 4 W1 (south of Morden) they migrated to (generated with the graphviz program package):
 
PNG eichenfeld to
                            homestead

Census map of Township 1 Range 5 West (Franz/Justina homesteaded in SW14-1-5W):

JPG Pic of
                              Franz Ens homestead area (1878-????)
                              [CLICK FOR LARGER]

Simple map showing locations of where my ancestors homesteaded:
PNG Pic
                              of relevant homesteads [CLICK FOR LARGER}

To see my generated homestead maps generated from the Canada ArchiviaNet Western Land Grants (1870-1930) site, use the image-clickable map below i.e. click on one of the township (1,2,3) and range (I,II,III,IV,V,VI) squares:

JPG map
                        1876

NOTE 2: There is no claim to the accuracy of the generated maps.  This is just my own humble attempt to convert the textual information on the database to a visual format.

For a nice historical map showing south-central Manitoba in 1876 (same year that Franz Enns family arrived), click this link.  A small piece of this map is shown below.  These maps came from the Halton Hills Public Library, but the original links are dead :(


MISCELLANEOUS

BIBLE REGISTERS

Bible Family Register of oldest known list of Franz Ens family

JPG Scan of Bible
                              Family Register

PREDECEASED

Except the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it. Ps. 127:1

This is a family register of our Grandparents the Jakob Enns'en family.

Grandfather Jakob Enns born in 1796.
Grandmother Susanna born Harder in 1797.

They were married in 1823.

Children born to this marriage were:

Anna called Anchen born in 1824.
Jakob called Jape born in 1826.
Wilhelm called Will born in 1831.
Susanna called Sues born in 1835. Died
Margereta called Greta born in 1838.
Heinrich called Hein born in 1843. Died.
Franz born in 1845.

Two children died in infancy.

Grandfather Jakob Enns died in 1863 in Russia.
Grandmother Susanna Enns died in 1872 in Russia.

Both our Grandparents emigrated to Russia with their parents at a very young age from West Prueussia in 1797.

Re-copied from the Family Register in 1922.

Katherina Enns/Peters.

[Bible family register translated into English (with much thanks) by Jack Friesen 1991]

Another Bible Family Register (my own family) of Franz Ens family:

JPG Scan of another Bible Family
                              Register
Franz Enns born 28 May 1845.

Justina Unger born 3 January 1847
and we were married 2 August 1866.

Franz born 19 January 1870.
Heinrich born July 8 1871.
Gerhard born 30 June 1873.
Anna born 21 May 1876.
Abraham born 5 April 1880.
Maria born 27 March 1883.
[Bible family register translated into English (very poorly) by myself. Note the mistakes and omittions from the true list: Helena (1869) and Justina (1875-1876) died in infancy and were not mentioned, and Jacob (1878-1950) was not mentioned at all!]

Newspaper story of farm accident involving Franz Ens Jr. in 1886

JPG Scan of
                              Mennonitische Rundschau story from Sept
                              15/1886 describing farm accident involving
                              Franz Ens Jr.

Today, 3rd of September, an accident occurred here which went out well. The adult son of the farmer Franz Enz, Jr. Neuosterwick, old colony of Russia, helped here to thresh, and as they wanted to get the engine some miles further, the boy wanted to climb on the seat of the steam machine which was pulled by oxen, somehow he fell back so closely to the back wheel of the machine that the wheel went over the left shoulder; the shoulder blade was split and torn off a little bit, a rib broken and the left ear squeezed. It Just missed his head, that would be his death. [Mennonitische Rundschau, September 15, 1886, translated into English (with much thanks) by Andreas Enns]

HOEPPNER HOMESTEAD

Very few sites remain our of ancestors original homesteads, but in the unusual case of Peter Hoeppner, some wood timbers from the original village in which his family lived (Waldheim, Lot 19, NW 23-2-5W) were moved and re-used at the original family homestead site (SW 16-2-5W).  Here is a recent photo of a building containing the original wood:

JPG Peter
                          Hoeppner homestead wood


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